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Easy cheesy five-minute Japanese-y: Learn five hiragana weekly 【Manga #2】 here too

#1 User is offline   mvcucumber Icon

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 06:11 PM

-- COPYPASTE START --

1) The first hiragana: あ (a)
(Pronounced like the “a” in “apple”, “cat”, “mat” etc)

Posted Image


▼ This guy is easy to remember because there’s an actual “A” inside of it. It’s like those ancient Japanese scribes wanted to give us English speakers a break.

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2) The second hiragana: い (i)
(Pronounced like the “i” in “Nintendo Wii“)

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▼ Just pretend there’s two little circles on top and you have what looks like the letter “i” twice. That makes it twice as easy to remember, right?


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3) The third hiragana: う (u)
(Pronounced like the “u” in “uber”)

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▼ There’s a “u” in this one, just chillin’ on its side.


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4) The fourth hiragana: え (e)
(Pronounced like the “e” in “exit”)

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▼ Now we have to start getting a little creative. Imagine an arrow
pointing to an Exit. Just like the ancient scribes drew it up.


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5) The last hiragana for today: お (o)
(Pronounced like the first “o” in Pokémon)

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▼ This one’s so easy! Just imagine a guy dropping his microphone
and being all like: “OH, I dropped it!”


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Okay, quiz time! Can you read the five hiragana below? (Hint: they’re not in the same order we just did them.)

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

(Scroll down for answer.)

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(Answer: i, a, u, o, e)

Did you get them right? If you don’t feel confident yet, then just scroll back up and let the beautiful mnemonics flow through your brain.


But now, it’s time for the main event. If you feel like you can read the first five hiragana no problem, then get ready to read your first entirely Japanese manga: an excerpt from the manga Two Piece written only using the first five hiragana:

Gorilla D. Ruffy has a dream… to become the Pilot King! After a tough fight where he and three-swordfish-wielding Zoru managed to get a ship, the Going Cherry, Ruffy explains that his dream isn’t to go to sea, but somewhere else….

(Read like a real Japanese manga, from top right to left.)


Posted Image


Transcription:
Zoru: Oi.

Zoru: Ii?

Ruffy: Iie.
Zoru: A?

Ruffy: Ue!

Translation:
Zoru: Hey.

Zoru: (Is that) good?

Ruffy: No.
Zoru: Oh?

Ruffy: (We’re going) up!

All right! Did you read it yourself? If not, then feel free to go back and master those first five hiragana, then give it another crack.

Next week we’ll be taking a look at the next five hiragana, and we’ll also have another parody manga.


おい / oi, hey
いい / ii, good
いいえ / iie, no
あ / a, oh
うえ / ue, up


-- COPYPASTE STOP --
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#2 User is offline   Jin Raziel Icon

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 03:02 AM

That certainly helped me learn faster than 5 minutes. Good stuff. Would be extra happy if we get the whole hiragana though.
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#3 User is offline   astroninja Icon

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 03:27 AM

as stupid as this is it actually worked
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#4 User is offline   sleepysheep7 Icon

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 03:31 AM

I thought あ was pronounced "ah" like in the word "father"?
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#5 User is offline   TheBeatlesPkmnFan42 Icon

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 04:47 AM

View Postsleepysheep7, on 27 May 2016 - 08:34 PM, said:

I thought あ was pronounced "ah" like in the word "father"?


Yes, it is. The OP is wrong.
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#6 User is offline   sleepysheep7 Icon

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 05:06 AM

View PostJin Rajieru, on 27 May 2016 - 09:05 PM, said:

That certainly helped me learn faster than 5 minutes. Good stuff. Would be extra happy if we get the whole hiragana though.


if you master あ、え、い 、お、う, and ん

You can pretty much pronounce anything in japanese. If you are a native english speaker then you might have to practice ら, れ, り, ろ, る, りゃ, りょ, and りゅ since they are consider the hardest to pronounce but still follow the same sound. From there it is just a matter of memorization of what each hiragana sound looks like.
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#7 User is offline   dreamer Icon

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 02:23 AM

how is this thread, containing wrong information (as already pointed out) and very limited usefulness
(nothing against op, but an entire thread for only the first few hirana characters..?) is pinned on top
while a thread that is genuinely useful for learning the language such as this one is left alone, to be buried by newer threads and ultimately forgotten..?
this makes absolutely no sense.
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#8 User is offline   AyuRox Icon

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 02:44 AM

View Postsleepysheep7, on 27 May 2016 - 11:34 PM, said:

I thought あ was pronounced "ah" like in the word "father"?



View PostTheBeatlesPkmnFan42, on 28 May 2016 - 12:50 AM, said:

Yes, it is. The OP is wrong.


Technically it's neither. The sound that あ represents, [a_"] in X-SAMPA and [ä] IPA, does not exist on it's own in General American English. This is a low central unrounded vowel. The a in father in GAE is usually described as a low back unrounded vowel, X-SAMPA:[A], IPA:[ɑ]. On the other hand, the a in cat is a near-low front unrounded vowel, [{]/[æ]. This puts Japanese's あ more or less right in the middle between these two sounds. I'd say both "a in father" and "a in cat" are equally inaccurate as a result. Since the sound doesn't exist in English, the best you can do is give a close estimate even though it's inaccurate. So while the article may be inaccurate, i can't really blame them since it's kind of impossible to be accurate.

As I said, it doesn't exist on it's own in GAE, but does exist more or less as the nucleus of the diphthong [aI]/[aɪ], such as in the words "time," "pie," "light," etc.

Speakers of Southern English, however, pronounce the diphthong [aɪ] as [ä] all the time simply as a part of the accent. If you can imagine a really southern drawl saying "I" or "eye" for example, you've achieved a proper Japanese あ.

[edit]
And if we're really going to split hairs, the only vowel that Japanese shares with (General American) English is [i]. The other 4 either don't exist entirely in GAE (う[M], え[e_o], お[o_o]) or only exist as part of diphthongs (あ[a]). I specify GAE because some other accents of English may have some of these sounds.
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#9 User is offline   dreamer Icon

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 02:59 AM

for sound accuracy, it's probably best to show a clip of a native speaker pronouncing it, or some web page where the pronunciation is shown.(iirc Genki site shows both the stroke order and pronunciation).
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#10 User is offline   mvcucumber Icon

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 10:27 PM

-- COPYPASTE START AGAIN --

All right, are you a master of the first five hiragana? Great. Let’s move on!

Today we’re going to look at the next five hiragana.

1) Today’s first hiragana: か (ka)
(Pronounced like “copy”)

Posted Image


▼ No problem here! This looks like a guy on his knees,
jammin’ out while singing some karaoke.


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2) Today’s next hiragana: き (ki)
(Pronounced like “key”)

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▼ This one looks like a bit of an oddly-shaped key.


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3) Today’s next-next hiragana: く (ku)
(Pronounced like “cocoon”)

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▼ Fun fact: Pac-man comes from the Japanese word paku paku,
which is the sound of eating. So just remember Paku-man!


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4) Today’s penultimate hiragana: け (ke)
(Pronounced like “okay“)

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▼ You have two kebob sticks, but only one of them has meat.
Hey, uh, some of these are harder than others….


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5) Today’s final hiragana: こ (ko)
(Pronounced like “co-pilot”)

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▼ If you fill in the blank space with your imagination,
it looks like a round coin.


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Okay, quiz time! Can you read the five hiragana below?
(Hint: they’re not in the same order we just did them.)

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And, if you’re already a pro at that, try reading all ten hiragana we’ve learned:


Posted Image


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(1st Quiz Answer: ke, ki, ko, ku, ka)
(2nd Quiz Answer: o, ku, u, i, ki // ke, ka, ko, a, e)

Did you get them right? If you don’t feel confident yet, try again until you’re a Pokémon hiragana master.

But for now, it’s time for another segment that I like to call: Particle Party.

▼ Hooray! Particle Party!


Posted Image


Japanese has lots of “particles,” which are basically “little” words that help the “more important” words in a sentence come together and make sense. They’re kind of like “at,” “of,” “the” etc. in English.

This week we’ll be looking at one of the most important particles, which also just so happens to be one of the hiragana we learned today: か (ka).

What Does か (ka) Do?
It has several uses, but when it comes at the end of a sentence, it turns a statement into a question.

Japan-glish Examples:
He is a ninja. (Statement)
He is a ninja か = Is he a ninja? (Question)

You are alive. (Statement)
You are alive か = Are you alive? (Question)

Easy, right? Now let’s take a look at the particle か and the rest of the hiragana you’ve learned so far by reading excerpt from the manga Narutoe.

Narutoe – a disembodied toe – and his friend Sauceke – a jar of spaghetti sauce – live in the hidden ninja village of Konohaha. Tomorrow is their chewnin exam, where they will hopefully pass and become real ninjas. But before that, they need to get something in their stomachs for dinner.

(Read like a real Japanese manga: panels go from top right to left,
hiragana is read from left to right.)


Posted Image


Transcription:
Sauceke: Koko kuu ka? (Koko = here, kuu = eat, ka = the particle we learned)
Narutoe: Ee! Ikou!

Narutoe: Kaki kuu ka? (Kaki = oysters, kuu = eat, ka = particle)
Sauceke: Iie.
Narutoe: Ika kuu ka? (Ika = squid, kuu = eat, ka = particle)
Sauceke: Iie.

Sauceke: Okaikei!
Narutoe: E?!

Narutoe: Okaikei kuu ka?! (Okaikei = check, kuu = eat, ka = particle)

Translation:
Sauceke: (Shall we) eat here?
Narutoe: Yeah! Let’s go!

Narutoe: (Will you) eat oysters?
Sauceke: No.
Narutoe: (Will you) eat squid?
Sauceke: No.

Sauceke: Check (please)!
Narutoe: Wha?!

Narutoe: (You’re going to) eat the check?!

All right! Did you read it yourself? If not, then keep reviewing those hiragana until they’re no problem, and give it another crack!
And don’t worry about the meaning of the words right now. For now, we’re just concentrating on learning to read the hiragana. But don’t fret, we’ll get to those pesky meanings eventually!
Next Friday we’ll be taking a look at the next five hiragana, which will be the easiest ones yet. We’ll also have another parody manga, so be sure to get ready for another barrage of hilarious heinous puns.
See you next Friday everyone, and remember to stay ridiculous!

ここ / koko, here
くう / kuu, to eat
ここ くう か / koko kuu ka, (shall we) eat here?
ええ / ee, yeah
いこう / ikou, let’s go!
かき / kaki, oysters
かき くう か / kaki kuu ka, (will you) eat oysters?
いか / ika, squid
いか くう か / ika kuu ka, (will you) eat squid
おかいけい / okaikei, check (please!)

-- COPYPASTE STOP --
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#11 User is offline   EdgyMemester Icon

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 08:15 PM

Why is this so helpful? I'm actually learning this. Wowzer's.
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