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How do you Say These Things in Japanese?... Some more or less basic phrases and words

#1 User is offline   Zar-Party Icon

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 11:44 PM

There are some phrases I want to make lyrics of.

EDIT: Whoops! 404 PAGE NOT FOUND
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This post has been edited by Zar-Party: 23 September 2017 - 08:37 PM

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#2 User is offline   AyuRox Icon

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 04:18 AM

だれか=somebody/anybody. か is a question particle but after interrogatives (question words like who what where etc) か is something else entirely, instead indicating an indefinite pronoun (some_____ or any_____ in English). Also a generally you see か only at the end of polite sentences (です/ます sentences). The most straight forward way is literally just だれ? otherwise you have options like だれですか。, だれなの? These all are just asking a general "who is it?". if you specifically want to point out "who is that?" You would need to specify a person, eg あの人は誰?. If the person was mentioned pretty recently beforehand, its probably not necessary to point them back out, though.

The most casual way to say something like "you ask" would be to add って? to the end of the question. って? is shortened from って言った? (or any similar verb like ask; the verb is implied in the shortened form) which basically is like "you said/asked "____"?". So it'd look like りんごって? (""apples?"") You're quoting back what the other person said to you. More formally you'd wanna use と instead of って and specify the verb, i.e., とききましたか。("Did you ask "____"?").

As for into my heart, it depends entirely on the sentence. More than likely its に, but に and で don't neatly overlap with anything in English. (Languages in general don't neatly overlap. If you're learning a language, Get out of the mindset that word X in this language is and can only be word Y in the other language.) に indicates motion towards something (going to the mall, adding ingredients to a bowl, etc), で indicates the location at which something happens (reading in the library, eating at mcdonald's). The problem is some words in English can do both of these depending on the context. take "walk in the mall" for example. In the sentence "after we got out of the car we walked in the mall and headed straight for the food court," this is に; you're walking in the direction of the mall, there's motion towards the mall. in the example "we walked in the mall for about 2 hours before we got bored and left", this is で, there's an action happening within the mall, its the location of the action walking.

Like i said, more than likely its に because its unlikely for the English word "into" to mean anything other than a motion towards something else.

The sharing one is more complex and I might have to get back to it. int he meantime, if you haven't used Jisho.org, i'd recommend it.

as for 俺, yes and no. you can use it anywhere you'd use 私 in the sense that they both mean "I", however 俺 differes from both 私
and 僕 in that its far more casual. 俺 is primarily used by men and only ever among your peers and people you're familiar with. You'd say it to friends, to classmates etc, but never to a teacher, your boss, a stranger on the street etc (unless you were trying to be rude with them or didn't really care what kind of impression you gave them).
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#3 User is offline   Zar-Party Icon

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:30 AM

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This post has been edited by Zar-Party: 23 September 2017 - 08:38 PM

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#4 User is offline   Zar-Party Icon

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 08:56 PM

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#5 User is offline   AyuRox Icon

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:25 PM

View PostZar-Party, on 25 August 2017 - 05:30 AM, said:

So, the first sentence would be "「だれ?」って?" with quotes? EDIT: It's read "tte", not "tsute", right? First time I see this as a single word.

I'd use に instead of で then because it's about the meteor which crashed in the direction of the heart. Is ガン寝 (it's from jisho.org. Btw, why in katakana?) the right word to say "crashed"? The full sentence would be 流星のよに君をガン寝こころに ,right?

共同 (kyodou) is the right word for "sharing"? I'll use 本当にありがとう instead of "I thank you from the bottom of my heart" because I'm already familiar with this sentence.
Now I'm confused about the entire phrase: Does 幸福と悲しみ (koufuku to kanashimi) or 共同 come first?

And thanks.


View PostZar-Party, on 25 August 2017 - 04:56 PM, said:

Can I use 大事にしたい (daiji ni shitai) as "My treasure forever"? It was translated in the song saturation like that but I have my doubts because my translator says it means "I want to cherish".


How much background do you have in Japanese? Some of these questions are very broad and general questions about the language as a whole (eg, word order) that I think would be better addressed by studying the basics of the language. Shy of taking an actual class, I'd recommend Tae Kim's Guide to Japanese. You can navigate the site with the links on the right.
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